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Beadboard Backsplash *******

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Style For Less Add texture and a touch of cottage style by installing a beadboard backsplash. Carefully Measure Use a flat-head screwdriver to remove outlet plates and switch plates that run along the backsplash area. Measure the backsplash area and make a drawing and cut list. Try to **** in four-**** sections, this will ensure that the wainscotting will line up easily. Remember to note the exact location of electrical switches and outlets. Cut the Beadboard Use a circular saw to cut the beadboard to size. To make cut-outs for outlets and switches, use a pencil to mark the exact shape of the cut out. Drill holes in two opposing corners with a large (3/8″ or 1/2″) bit. Then drop in the blade of a jig saw into one of the holes then cut out the rest of the opening. Make Sure it Fits Test fit the beadboard before securing it to the wall. Ensure that the cut-outs align properly with outlets. Apply Adhesive Using a caulk gun, apply heavy-duty construction adhesive such as Liquid Nails in a serpentine pattern to the back of the beadboard. Press the beadboard onto the wall. Fasten it to the Wall Use a finish nailer or hammer Brad nails around the perimeter of each section of backsplash. Patch and Finish Fill the nail holes and paint or stain your *** backsplash.
beadboard backsplash ******* 1

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

So I thought it was about time I put together the tutorial for the beadboard backsplash I put up in the *******. It was a semi-easy and inexpensive way to brighten up the space. Here is a before picture of our *******. Well, actually this is an in progress picture. When we ***** moved in the hardware was yellow and was centered in the middle of the cabinets. We filled in all the holes with wood filler, sanded, primed and painted them. We replaced the hardware with these bronze knobs from Lowe’s. I would like to replace the hardware on the drawers sometime soon with something a little different. But I **** the finish of them so that won’t change. We don’t get a ton of ******* light in here so it was in desperate need of some brightening up! I had Matt’s dad help me take out the **** florescent lights from under the cabinets. Then I took a crow bar and got to **** ripping out the backsplash. ********* sight right? I had to unscrew all those nails from underneath the cabinet and the ones I couldn’t get to I hammered down. Then I scraped off the pieces of wood particle that were left from the backsplash and sanded it smooth. I fixed the places in the wall that had gotten ripped from the backsplash extraction. So once everything had been prepped I measured the space between the counter and the bottom of the cabinet and the length of space that would need the beadboard. I took my measurements to **** Depot and they cut the pieces for me. So much faster than doing it myself! I measured where the outlet holes needed to be and drew them out with a pencil. I piloted holes into each of the corners using my drill. This was my ***** time doing this. I was just practicing with the hole in the middle. =) I used a jigsaw to cut out the holes. After all the holes were cut out I used liquid nails to attach the beadboard to the wall. I used small white nails to secure it a little more just placing them in a few places around the edges. Matt’s dad raised the outlets a little for me so they would be level with the beadboard. I caulked around all the edges and where I pushed two pieces of beadboard together and then painted everything with a ****** coats of bright white. Because my countertops were not flush with the wall I had to use a ***** baseboard to cover up the space. Matt’s dad helped me add a small piece of wood to the back to make them ***** enough to cover it completely. I didn’t attach the baseboard molding to the wall right away because I wasn’t sure what I was going to do about the counter at that time. I decided to paint my countertops to look like granite. You can check out the details of that in this post. I just finished painting the ******* walls and will show you as soon as I finish up with a little accessorizing. The other half of the ******* is almost finished so I’ll post pictures of that also. I’ve got lots of projects I’m working on this summer and will try and post as much as I can! Thanks for reading! I’m linking up with a few of these parities. Check them out!
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Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

AnonymousSeptember 27, 2012 at 1:11 PMIt looks great! I'm doing a similar project. I had installed a kneewall on the length of the island with a microwave/bookcase shelf on the end and had it made bar height, with beadboard. I'm wanting to refinish all the cabinets and paint them a linen white since the *** granite is very dark. Instead of stripping the cabinets I'm now wondering if it would look good to reface just the framework and ends of the cabinets with beadboard to make it look cohesive. Although, If I cut out for the cabinet openings, I'm not sure how to finish off the beadboard so there isn't a raw edge. Maybe I shouldn't go there, or maybe I should do just the ends of the cabinets. The primed beadboard is the same thickness as the filler panels that are there already. What do you think?ReplyDelete
beadboard backsplash ******* 3

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Although I LOVED the richness and depth in all your before pictures; I can appreciate wanting a change or a brighter look. Great ideas.My opinions only: (since you asked!)I would not touch the appliance cubby! That idea struck me as really odd, same thing when you mentioned putting beadboard on the side of the cabinets, I would NOT go there. The white is just too stark, it would look to abrupt and unfinished to me. (Hope I'm not offending you, but sometimes it's easy to lose perspective when you are knee deep in a project, I know it!)I **** how you trimmed it out! Be sure every crack, gap, and opening is caulked, especially near windows, sinks and stoves. (Ok, everywhere!) It is ok to glue beadboard to tile, but if there are gaps, moisture can get inside and start a petri dish of mold growing on the backside of the wood beadboard. Be CERTAIN air cannot get in between the tile and the beadboard! (I speak from experience here!)
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Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

The word beadboard actually refers to two different types of paneling: genuine hand-assembled beadboard and its manufactured lookalike. Genuine beadboard consists of tongue and groove boards that are fitted together at the bead point. Manufactured beadboard means plywood, fiberboard, or wood paneling in large pieces which have been cut to mimic the tongue and groove effect.
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Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Handcrafted beadboard has the benefit of quality, but as in all things in life, if you want handmade, you’ll have to pay for it. Genuine tongue and groove beadboard is much more labor-intensive to make, and therefore more expensive. So if you want to reap the financial benefits of beadboard, you’ll need to opt for beadboard paneling.
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Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

It looks great! I'm doing a similar project. I had installed a kneewall on the length of the island with a microwave/bookcase shelf on the end and had it made bar height, with beadboard. I'm wanting to refinish all the cabinets and paint them a linen white since the *** granite is very dark. Instead of stripping the cabinets I'm now wondering if it would look good to reface just the framework and ends of the cabinets with beadboard to make it look cohesive. Although, If I cut out for the cabinet openings, I'm not sure how to finish off the beadboard so there isn't a raw edge. Maybe I shouldn't go there, or maybe I should do just the ends of the cabinets. The primed beadboard is the same thickness as the filler panels that are there already. What do you think?
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Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

The ******* makeover is coming right along and I just **** it more and more with each change! If you want to go back to the beginning you can see the before pictures here, considering all the much updated options available in laminate countertops, and installing our own *** laminate countertops. And now we have a beadboard backsplash and beadboard on the back of the bar wall too. Beadboard is an inexpensive, easy DIY option for a backsplash and also goes with the somewhat farmhouse look I am going for.
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TinaTxJune 11, 2010 at 1:42 PMI'm a HUGE beadboard fan and yours looks fab! I had beadboard in most of the rooms at my *** house and loved it (except when it needed painting! that is a PITA, but worth it). I'm still trying to figure out where I can put beadboard in this house.Your ******* cabinets look about the same color as mine – I'm seriously thinking about painting them. I **** painted cabinets, I'm just a little afraid of painting those pre-finished ones.You did a great ***!Congrats!ReplyDelete

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